Blog

Coping in a Worldwide Pandemic

by Sandy Botros, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 2025

Many college students are experiencing higher than normal stress and anxiety levels due to the Covid-19 pandemic. If you are stressed, do not worry - you are not alone. Covid-19 has been impacting students all over the world. Many students have been dealing with different challenges, from shifting to remote instruction to losing a loved one. Confronting campus closure and transitioning to online learning is definitely not an easy task. They are also missing out on the full experience of being a college student in terms of campus life and having fun with friends.

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Expos is Exciting! Here's Why...

By Gillian Durante, SAS 2023

The Writing Program offers plenty of unique opportunities for writers of any discipline to flex their writerly muscles through an impressive array of interesting and rigorous courses. But almost every student at this University, regardless of major, will encounter the infamous “Expository Writing 101,” a course all Rutgers undergraduates are expected to take and pass. Whether you’re an aspiring business woman, pharmacist, physicist, or artist at Rutgers, “Expos” is a must. It doesn’t matter how little or how much you expect to read or write for your anticipated career, Expos will help prepare you.  Because Expos is more about critical thinking than anything else, and we all need to master that skill.

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The Case for Distracted Writing

by Amanda Wells SAS 2021

The problem with college writing is that it seems so serious. 

There’s a certain sort of expectation for it. College writers are told good college writing takes place on the silent level of the library. It preferably happens several weeks before the due date. It must involve carefully annotated articles and morning coffee. At the very least, good college writing seems to necessitate noise cancelling headphones. 

There’s also the pressure of college performance in general. High school teachers do nothing if not opine the seriousness of college papers; watch your margins, they say, because your professors will use a ruler to measure them. There’s the matter of office hours and peer editing, each more confusing than the last. There’s the transition from fiction to non-fiction, and the trip from formulaic writing to free form writing.

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Are You the "Passenger" or the "Driver"?

By Gillian Durante - SAS 2023         

I’ll start this off with a short anecdote. I was once working with a student on “summary versus analysis,” that ever-confounding quest to understand, 1) what do our professors even mean when they tell us not to summarize?; 2) what is analysis supposed to look like? and 3) probably the worst of all – how do we get past thinking we have already analyzed when, in fact, we’ve only scratched the surface? I know. We’ve all been there. We’re stuck staring at words on paper, thinking we’ve done the work and said all there is to be said. 

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